Deep Bowl with lines incised through black pigment over white glaze - Rupert Spira

Deep Bowl with lines incised through black pigment over white glaze, Rupert Spira, 2004. Image © Heini Schneebeli

Object Details

Date of making
2004
Date of acquisition
2004
Technique/Process
Ceramics: thrown stoneware
Materials
Stoneware, iron pigment, glaze
Dimensions
H250mm x W480mm
Collection Number
P483

Maker Details

Birthplace
London, England
Place Trained
West Surrey College of Art and Design, 1983; Wenford Bridge Pottery, trained with Michael Cardew, 1980-1982; West Surrey College of Art and Design, BA (Hons), 1978-1980
Studio
West Surrey College of Art and Design, 1983 Wenford Bridge Pottery, trained with Michael Cardew, 1980-1982 West Surrey College of Art and Design, BA (Hons), 1978-1980
Awards
Crafts Council Research Bursary, 1988; Crafts Council Setting Up Grant, 1981
Link
website -->

About

Rupert Spira is known for his studio pottery. His works vary in size from bowls only a few centimetres across through to huge open bowls, 50 centimetres or more in diameter. His approach to ceramics sets out to explore the relationship between consciousness and form, between the mind and the object. At the time of acquisition in 2004, when asked how he felt about his work being used, Spira responded that he preferred to think of living with a piece. He claimed that in living with a piece ‘we use it in the fullest sense of the word: we handle it, adapt it to our needs as a receptacle, but also contemplate it, get to know it, and give it time to reveal all that has gone into its making.’

Miss Ramirez Chair was amongst the works selected by curator Ralph Turner for the 2008 Crafts Council touring exhibition ‘Collecting a Kaleidoscope’.

Read more about related loans and exhibitions

Mark Henderson
says...

“This is a truly exquisite piece. I first caught sight of it on entering the Crafts Council’s offices from the grime and hustle of North London. To my eyes, it’s timeless, big, confident, simple and yet modest. The gentle curve of the top lip, formed, I assume, from a squeeze before firing, is reminiscent of the shape of a full Moses basket. The extraordinary patience and pleasing complexity that went into the ‘lines incised through an iron pigment over a matt white glaze’ contributes to the elegance of the whole. I can imagine the careful eye of the maker, an extraordinary craftsman. It is a testament to the hand and eye.”

Mark Henderson

Mark Henderson, Chair, Savile Row Bespoke

http://www.savilerowbespoke.com

From the Archive

Gallery guide for 2008 Crafts Council touring exhibition 'Collecting a Kaleidoscope' curated by Ralph Turner © Crafts Council

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